Browsing Archive

March, 2013

Stay Cool and Comfortable in Our Penn Mere Shirt

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The new Penn Mere Shirt, with its subtle feminine print motif  of the mountain laurel flower, is a nod to our Pennsylvanian outdoor heritage. Whether you are enjoying a cup of coffee and a book on your porch, are meeting a friend for lunch, or are out with the family on a weekend adventure, this shirt will keep you cool and comfortable.

The Penn Mere’s lightweight 100% cotton dobby stays away from the skin for a soft, airy feel. With its adjustable three-quarter sleeves, it goes to great lengths for springtime versatility.

Shop for the Penn Mere Shirt and more in our Spring 2013 digital catalog.

View our digital version online and browse all our new spring styles and colors. For a free copy in the mail, sign-up here.

With These Hands – Raw Wool to Finished Fabric

HandsInWool

Our tradition of custom-designed woolens dates back to our founder, John Rich. In 1830 he constructed his first woolen mill in Plum Run, Pennsylvania. From his mule cart, he sold his quality fabrics to loggers, miners, rivermen and trappers. By 1845, he expanded the mill and moved to what is now Woolrich, Pennsylvania.

Over the years, eight generations of his family have lived and worked amidst the same rural landscape of north     central Pennsylvania, not two miles from where John Rich erected his first woolen mill. It is in these roots that we find a deep commitment to producing premium American fabrics that are as functional today as they were in the mid-nineteenth century. Bales of raw wool still come in one end of the mill and, after a good deal of work, exit as  superior fabric.

Raw Wool –  raw wool enters our mill and after several processes is woven into the       superior fabric that is synonymous with Woolrich.
Yarn Dye Kettle – During this process the spun yarn is dyed to the correct color needed for weaving.  These large kettles can dye up to 150 spools of yarn at a time.  Dying time varies depending on color and weight of yarn.Cone Winding - Here the spun wool yarn is placed on cones.  Cones are conical shaped bobbins made of plastic or paper.  The speed of the bobbins is controlled so that a yarn with a soft even slub is ready for     weaving.

Warping - The warp is the yarn that runs lengthwise in a woven fabric. During this process the yarns are arranged in parallel order on a beam in  preparation for weaving.

Weaving Loom - On the weaving loom the warp beam is loaded and the yarns are run through heedles and reeds. The weft yarns are shot across the warp yarns with a shuttle completing the weaving of the fabric.

Burling/Mending Station - Removal of loose threads, knots, slubs, burs and other extraneous materials by means of a burling iron, a type of tweezers, occurs at the burling/mending station.  The trick is to remove the impurity without damaging the fabric.  After     weaving and prior to finishing, any lumps (burls), knots or loose threads are removed by hand.
Finished Fabric - Finished fabric is rolled on various bolts depending on final application.  Many bolts are shipped just  15 minutes away to our finishing facility and turned into the quality blankets which the  Woolrich name has become famous for worldwide.  Other fabric is cut and sent to crafters and civil war re-enactors.  A full line of fabric is available to purchase by-the-yard on our website at woolrich.com.

For Rainy Days

RainGear

This spring, rain will not keep you from exploring the outdoors. Whether you’re running errands downtown, watching a game outside, or hitting the trail, pack your storable Woolrich raincoat to keep yourself dry and comfortable.

Woolrich Packable Rain Gear

The Kristie Raincoat for women and the Wetland Raincoat for men are waterproof, windproof, breathable and packable jackets that will ensure you have a dry and comfortable spring. To see both our Women’s raincoats in all colors, click here.

To get inspired for rainy days, check out this Pinterest board and see why, when it rains, Woolrich shines.