When you order a “lager” in Pennsylvania, the barkeep knows the drill. Yeungling Beer is as essential to Pennsylvanians as Woolrich wool, Hammond Pretzels and Coleman Pop-Up Campers. Back in the day, true connoisseurs of this traditional brew would transport it across state boarders to holiday gatherings and football parties just to maintain their fix. No Yankee beer competitor could replicate a tastier lager than that of America’s oldest family-owned brewery (or, at least that’s what my uncle would say).

Today, despite competition from heavy industry hitters, D.G. Yuengling & Son has surpassed Boston Beer Co., an industry infant in comparison, as the largest US-owned brewer (LINK).

While other foreign-owned brewers, such as Anheuser-Bush, gloat in patriotic marketing, Yeungling remains one of few beer purveyors “keeping it real.” No longer do Yeungling enthusiasts need to pack their coolers for a trip to the in-laws. Yeungling products are available in 14 states up and down the East Coast. Their latest expansion to neighboring Ohio is seen as one of the most successful developments in a slumping marketplace.

It’s quite an accomplishment to make national waves with regional distribution. Pennsylvanians should be proud that their Pottsville company contributes to a prevailing locavore movement. Still, with Boston Beer Co. riding on their shirttails, Yeungling needs to maintain its buzz. Yankee consumers better start upping the ante because it won’t be long before Yeungling crowds its way into New England’s bars … Move over Sam Adams, Yeungling’s on tap.